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Task 21 - Standardisation of Energy Savings Calculations

Synopsis | Introduction | Objectives | Approach | Subtasks | Contacts | Participation | Publications | Publications

Synopsis

What are the most important elements for the quantitative evaluation of the energy savings impacts of policies and measures and can these be organised in a broader agreement on the basic concepts, rules and system borders in IEA member states?

The European Commission wants to harmonise bottom-up monitoring and (in a later phase) evaluation work within the 27 Member States for reporting progress in energy efficiency improvements. The International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation (IPEEC) stimulates improvements in among others methodologies of energy measurement, auditing and verification procedures and certification protocols.

With this Task the IEA DSM Agreements wants to provide a framework of the basic concepts, rules and system borders to stimulate the development of standards on energy savings calculations and related greenhouse gas emissions one hand and ensure global comparability of these standards.

Introduction

Many policies and measures for improving energy efficiency now exist and continue to improve, both of a voluntary and mandatory nature, The continued development of this field of policy reflects growing acceptance of the importance of such measures in seeking to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, minimise the cost of energy services, enhance energy security and address wider environmental concerns. Estimations as to projected energy savings, emissions reductions or financial gains from energy efficiency measures are now common place. Recent examples include the November 2007 report of the United States (US) National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Leadership Group, the European Union (EU) Energy Efficiency Action Plan, which anticipates that if energy consumption is cut by 20% by 2020, the Fourth Assessment Report (2007) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which concludes that energy efficiency measures will play a key role in mitigating the human-induced effects of climate change across many of its scenarios, for most regions and timescales

On 8 June 2008, the G8 countries, China, India, South Korea and the European Community decided to establish the International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation (IPEEC) In their scope one of the areas they want to take action to facilitate improvements is: methodologies of energy measurement, auditing and verification procedures, certification protocols and other tool to achieve optimal energy efficiency performance over the lifetime of building and industrial processes, relevant products, appliances and equipment. With this new Task the IEA DSM Agreements wants to provide products related to methodologies of energy measurements.

Evaluation is an essential component of any compliance process and an essential aspect of sound policy implementation more broadly. Evaluation plays a key role in helping to determine whether energy efficiency policy has met its goals. Some compelling reasons to evaluate energy efficiency programmes are:

  • Ex-ante analysis of energy efficiency policy options can help to ensure that the most appropriate policies are selected.
  • Evaluation during policy implementation allows policy makers to address policy design problems along the way and for updates to the policy measure to be made as necessary.
  • Ex-post analysis of energy efficiency policies allows for an assessment of whether a measure has achieved its intended objectives or not, how and why, and thus can enhance learning from the effectiveness or otherwise of past measures.
  • Evaluation is essential for verifying tradable units of energy conservation, such as in White Certificate Trading programmes and government commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

How the ex-post energy savings calculations are conducted are the most important element for the quantitative evaluation of the energy savings impacts of policies and measures. Within the EU the ESD is a new stimulus to harmonise bottom-up monitoring and (in a later phase) evaluation work within the 27 Member States. In the near future European standards for energy savings will become available. But also in other countries and regions work is ongoing in this field. A broader agreement on the basic concepts, rules and system borders in IEA member states can stimulate the development of these standards on one hand and ensure global (maybe world-wide) comparability of standards for energy saving calculation on the other.

The experiences from the EU standardisation process show that most energy experts are not common with the rules on standardisation. But also that the main conducted work for standardisation is on a detailed level of appliances or components. Standardisation on a energy efficiency improvement and energy savings should start with more common understanding within the energy expert. Only if there is already a common ground on terms and definition within energy experts a next step in more official standardisation under the umbrella ot the ISO could have a reasonable chance to result in a set of standards.

In the evaluation of DSM, Energy Efficiency and Demand Response actions a number of effects can be taken into consideration. There is a need for an overall view over the several Tasks within the IEA DSM Agreement for the following groups of effects for energy, environmental impacts, costs and investment impacts on different places of the electricity system (the consumers site, the electrical systems and the general energetic system), the scale of premises (regional, national and global premises) and the scope (short and long term). Within the Kyoto commitments countries can use flexible mechanism as CDM and JI. Most of those projects calculate energy savings and resulting avoided greenhouse gas emissions. In the second commitment period the system of flexible mechanism will continue and a step forward in more standardised methods would ease the use of this mechanism.

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Objectives

The overall aim of Task XXI is to identify basic concepts, calculation rules and systems for Energy Savings Calculations (ESC) standards. Additional a methodology should be developed to nominate and describe the several Demand Response products. Within this framework of basic concept and calculation rules also the relation to reduction of the environmental impacts in greenhouse gas emissions from energy savings should be incorporated. The Task will also explore how an by what type of organisations these standards could be use and improved to increase international comparable evaluation of policies and measures.

The proposed objectives for the Task are:

  • To identify national and regional existing energy saving calculation (ESC) standards and standards under development and most important reports for use in developing ESC standards;
  • To identify what basic concepts, calculation rules and systems are in use in these ESC standards;
  • To develop within the framework of basic concepts a methodology to nominate and describe the several Demand Response products;
  • To identify how and why these standards are or will be used in reporting on energy efficiency improvements, energy savings and impact evaluations for policies and measures including estimating and reporting greenhouse gas emissions;
  • To identify what organisations could be responsible for the maintenance and future development of these standards and conditions to do such a work;
  • To explore to what extent the basic concepts, calculation rules and systems could be organised in such a way that (inter)national organisation can use these to improve international comparison (ahead of implementation of new standards);
  • To explore how these standards can be used in national saving calculation;
  • To explore how these standards can improve international comparable evaluation of policies and measures

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Approach

The actual research work will be carried out by a combination of the country experts, the Operating Agent, inputs from (experts involved in) standardisation bodies and from Operating Agents and reports for other relevant IEA DSM Tasks. In general the experts are responsible for identifying and obtaining information on ESC standards in their countries. The Operating Agent is responsible for mobilising inputs and comments from standardisation bodies, from other IEA Tasks, and for analysing and drawing conclusions for the information provided by the experts.

At least one but preferable two regional (Europe, North America, Asia, Pacific region) workshops will be organised. Additional to mobilise input for standardisation bodies the developed work will be presented, if possible in a form that could be used for training purposes.

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Subtasks

The Work plan for Standardisation of Energy Efficiency Calculations will comprise four subtasks:

  • Subtask 1: Existing energy savings calculation (ESC) standards and standards under development, and use of most relevant reports for ESC
  • Subtask 2: Basic concept, rules and systems for ESC standards
  • Subtask 3: Potential for use and continue development and maintenance of ESC standards
  • Subtask 4: Communication and information

Subtask 1: Existing energy savings calculation (ESC) standards and standards under development, and use of most relevant reports for ESC

Subtask objectives

To identify national and regional existing energy saving calculation (ESC) standards and standards under development

To identify and asses the most relevant evaluation and monitoring reports for ESC

To identify basic concepts, calculation rules and systems.

To identify the key elements to nominate and describe Demand Response products.

Subtask Deliverable

A report summarising the most relevant guidelines and standards – national and international - on ESC, with a focus on identifying common approaches for determining savings and terminology as well as key elements to nominate Demand Response products.

Work to be carried out

The country experts will identify national standards and indicate regional standards and also what barriers exist for transforming energy savings calculations into agreed standards. As far as possible these barriers will be researched for different parties (governmental organisations, producers, consumers, scientific groups). In this process the country experts and the Operating Agent will also include definitions for DR products. The country experts, as well as the Operating Agent, will identify the most relevant evaluation and monitoring reports for ESC. They will asses these reports for use to define basic concepts, calculation rules and systems

The Operating Agent will ensure (in co-operating with the participating national experts) that the international standards will be included. He will include experiences from other Tasks within the IEA DSM Agreement, from the finalised Task XIV White certificates, Task I, Evaluation guidebook and Task XIII Demand Response Resources and ongoing Task XVI on Competitive Energy Services and Task XVIII DSM and Climate Change. He will also take care of knowledge development in other IEA Implementing Agreements; especially the ECBCS where new work is under development is for "Global Building Energy Consumption Data Benchmarking" and 4E for Efficient Electrical End-Use Equipment.

He will organise the country experts’ assessment of the most relevant documents. Once all the information is collected, the Operating Agent will summarise the results and draft a report summarising the most relevant guidelines and standards on ESC and barriers to realise standards as well as key element to nominate and describe DR products. This draft report will be discussed and commented by the country experts.

Subtask 2: Basic concepts, rules and systems for ESC standards

Subtask objective

To draft the basic concepts, calculation rules and systems are in use in ESC and how these are transformable to (draft) standards.

To develop a methodology to nominate and describe the Demand Response products, including ‘general accepted’ criteria.

For existing standards or standards under preparation to identify how and why these standards are or could be used in impact evaluation for policies and measures.

To provide comments to organisations that have draft ESC standards or standards under development.

Subtask Deliverable

A report dealing with the basic concepts, calculation rules and systems. This report could be used for development by national and international standard organisation(s) and or comparable institutions. This report will include definitions and generally accepted evaluation criteria for Demand Response products and gives attention to reduced greenhouse gas emissions related to energy savings.

Also an overview will be presented on how existing guidelines could be utilised or modified to make results from energy savings calculation more comparable and more harmonised in the future.

A compilation report on the comments to and experiences with commenting on draft ESC standards, including reactions from the standardization organisations on comments and their views on identified barriers (from subtask 1).

Work to be carried out

By the end of the year 2009 a draft for harmonised bottom up evaluation methods is expected for the EU that countries might use for reporting the progress in National Energy Efficiency Action Plans. Some new elements will be:

  • 3 levels of harmonised evaluation methods (in line with the IPCC approach in so called TIER and the level of efforts in the IEA DSM evaluation guidebook)
  • energy savings lifetime to be used in calculating energy savings;
  • harmonisation at the level of systems (e.g. buildings)

By the first half of the year 2009 also a draft CEN standard for bottom-up and top-down energy savings calculations will be available for comments.

The work undertaken in Subtask 1 will result in information on ongoing work for drafting national and regional standards outside Europe.

The country experts will contribute and comment on updated versions of the report on the basic concepts, calculation rules and systems as well as on the section dealing with a methodology to nominate Demand Response products. They will give attention to the opportunities to implement the common elements in the national and regional standards for energy savings calculations and report on the (potential) usefulness of the three level approach and the harmonisation of energy savings lifetime. Related to ongoing or planned standardisation work for energy savings calculations they will consult the national standardisation bodies and – if applicable - draft comments on (selected) national standards.

The country experts will also collect information on potential ‘general accepted’ criteria to be included in a methodology to nominate and describe the Demand Response products.

The Operating Agent will co-ordinate the improvements of draft reports on the basic concepts, calculation rules and systems. He will take care that definitions for DR products will be compatible with relevant existing terminologies, especially the System operation and the Market operation terminology used by energy companies. For the experts’ discussion on these drafts he will organise a restricted section of the IEA DSM Website.

The Operating Agent will draft comments on regional standards while the country experts will do this for the national standards. The Operating Agent will be responsible for organising the process of discussion on these drafts (using a restricted section of the IEA DSM Website) and the co-ordination of the reactions to and from the standardisation organisations.

The Operating Agent will consult the international standardisation organisations and is responsible for the co-ordination of the country experts’ consultations He will also ensure that there is a good communication process with the Operating Agents for other relevant Tasks within the IEA DSM Agreement, for ESC as well as for DR definitions.

He will present preliminary conclusions from the work on international meetings to get involvement from as broader range of market organisations.

Subtask 3: Potential for continue development and maintenance of ESC standards

Subtask objective

To finalise the report on the basic concepts, calculation rules and systems including related GHG emissions and Demand Response products.

To explore how the information in the report could be used as training material

To identify what organisations could be the main actor to continue the development, the maintenance and future development of these standards.

To explore to what extent the basic concepts, calculation rules and systems could be organised in such a way that (inter)national standards organisations can use these to improve international comparability.

To explore how these standards can ease international more comparable evaluations of policies and measures.

To explore how the methodology to nominate and describe the Demand Response products, including ‘general accepted’ criteria could be used by other IEA DSM Tasks and relevant (inter)national organisations

Subtask Deliverable

The final report on the basic concepts, calculation rules and systems.

A report on roadmaps along which ESC standards could be further developed, taken into account the working processes of responsible standardisation organisations, but given more attention to international comparability. The report will also give attention to improved use of the ESC standards in evaluation of policies and measures

Work to be carried out

The country experts will research, using the (draft) reports from subtask 1 and 2, the (inter)national organisations responsible for the further development of the results of the IEA work into official ESC standards, the working processes and the planning. They will asses the expected use of existing and future ESC standards in evaluation of policies and measures and meta-evaluation and/or reports. They will take into account the relations with (inter)national estimations of GHG emissions. They will consult relevant national organisation for comments to the draft methodology to nominate and describe the Demand Response products, including ‘general accepted’ criteria.

The experts will give input to and comments on the drafts of the final report and the report on roadmaps. They will give special attention to the potential of the draft report for use as support material for training

The Operating Agent will organise the communication with the international standardisation organisation. Two regional workshops could be organised assuming that one workshop will be hosted and one organised from the Task’ budget.

The Operating Agent will finalise the report on the basic concepts, calculation rules and systems including the section on DR product. For the report he will draft the conclusions and recommendations for maintenance of ESC standards and results from discussion with country experts and relevant market parties and Operating Agents for relevant IEA DSM Tasks,

Subtask 4: Communication and information

Subtask objective

To inform experts and engage stakeholders and communicate the ongoing work in the Task on ESC standards;

To provoke the Reference manual for DR products and discuss this with other IEA DSM Tasks.

Stimulate adoption of the concepts and terms by IPEEC and other international institutions on policies, research, trade and education.

Subtask Deliverable

  • Task leaflet and newsletters
  • At least one presentation on a relevant international conference
  • Regional workshops on ESC standards
  • Status reports and final reports to the EXCO
  • Participating in relevant workshop related to the EXCO meetings
  • Contributions to the IEA DSM Annual reports and spot lights

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Contacts

Harry Vreuls[NL] Operating Agent [ h.vreuls@senternovem.nl]
Expert
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Expert

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Participation

Task XXI

Netherlands

 

Austria 

France 

Korea 

 Norway

 Spain

Switzerland

USA


Operating Agent

 

Participating Country

 

 

Task XXI is open for participation

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Publications


Task XXI revised work plan - 28 November 2008

Task XXI revised flyer - 11 August 2011

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Publications

Country report France final 23 August 2012
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 Energy Savings Calculations for selected end use technologies and existing evaluation practices in France...
Country report Korea final 4 October 2012
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 Energy Savings Calculations for selected end use technologies and existing evaluation practices in the Republic of Korea...
Country report Norway final 11September 2012
[1170 kb]
 Energy Savings Calculations for selected end use technologies and existing evaluation practices in Norway...
Country Report Spain final 10 September 2012
[2119 kb]
 Energy Savings Calculations for selected end use technologies and existing evaluation practices in Spain...
country report USA final 18 September 2012
[5292 kb]
 Energy Savings Calculations for selected end use technologies and existing evaluation practices in the USA...
Country reports Netherlands final 25 july 2012
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 Energy Savings Calculations for selected end use technologies and existing evaluation practices in The Netherlands...
Roadmaps improved harmonised ESC final
[20733 kb]
 Roadmaps for improved harmonised Energy Savings Calculations...
Report on Energy savings calculation final version
[526 kb]
 Harmonised Energy Savings Calculations for selected end-use technologies,key elements and practical formulas ...

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